RPM ACT REINTRODUCED IN CONGRESS – American Motorcyclist Association

RPM ACT REINTRODUCED IN CONGRESS

RPM Act Bill would protect U.S. motorsports

U.S. Rep. Patrick McHenry (R-NC) and his colleagues reintroduced H.R. 350, the Recognizing the Protection of Motorsports Act of 2017 (RPM Act), a bipartisan bill that would protect the right to modify street vehicles into dedicated racecars and the industry’s right to sell the parts that enable racers to compete.

The AMA joins SEMA and other organizations in supporting this important legislation.

The RPM Act, cosponsored by 44 members of the U.S. House, would ensure that converting motor vehicles, including motorcycles, for use exclusively in competition does not violate the federal Clean Air Act.

For nearly 50 years, the practice was unquestioned until the EPA published proposed regulations in 2015 that deemed such conversions illegal and subject to severe penalties. While the EPA withdrew the problematic language from the final rule making last year, the agency still maintains the practice is unlawful.

When the RPM Act was first introduced in 2016, racing enthusiasts and Americans working in the motorsports parts industry flooded Congress with nearly 200,000 letters in support of the bill.

Motorsports competition involves tens of thousands of participants and vehicle owners each year, both amateur and professional, according to SEMA. Retail sales of racing products make up a $1.4 billion market annually.  There are an estimated 1,300 racetracks operating across the country, including oval, road, track and off-road racetracks, the majority of which feature converted race vehicles that the EPA now considers to be illegal.

Source: RPM Act reintroduced in Congress – American Motorcyclist Association

AMERICAN MOTORCYCLIST ASSOCIATION OBJECTS TO SCOPE OF TWO NEW NATIONAL MONUMENTS

AMERICAN MOTORCYCLIST ASSOCIATION OBJECTS TO SCOPE OF TWO NEW NATIONAL MONUMENTS

President’s designations raise concerns about motorized access to public lands

PICKERINGTON, Ohio  – The designation of two new national monuments by President Barack Obama this week could jeopardize access for responsible motorized recreation on more than 1.6 million acres of public land in Utah and Nevada.

Using the Antiquities Act of 1906, the president designated 1.35 million acres in southeast Utah as the Bears Ears National Monument and nearly 300,000 acres in Clark County, Nev., just northeast of Las Vegas, as the Gold Butte National Monument.

“We are concerned about continued access to these public lands for responsible motorized recreation,” said Wayne Allard, AMA vice president for government relations. “With the national monument designation comes a review of management plans that could curtail or eliminate some off-road riding areas.”

The Antiquities Act authorizes the president to issue proclamations to protect “historic landmarks, historic and prehistoric structures, and other objects of historic or scientific interest,” while limiting those designations to “the smallest area compatible with proper care and management of the objects to be protected.”

“These new designations cover far larger areas than needed to ensure that historic landmarks are preserved,” Allard said. “None of the Utah congressional delegation wanted this, and many Nevadans were opposed to it, too.

“The designation of national monuments, whether by the president or by Congress, should include careful consideration of the wishes of local stakeholders, including nearby communities, elected officials and those who use the land,” Allard continued.

Utah’s attorney general has threatened a lawsuit to reverse the Bears Ears designation, and the Utah congressional delegation vowed to pursue legislation to undo it.

A study by UtahPolicy cited by U.S. Sen. Mike Lee (R-Utah) found that 60 percent of Utah residents opposed designating the Bears Ears area as a national monument, while 33 percent supported the proposal.

Nevada’s congressional delegation was divided along party lines, with Democrats praising the designations and Republicans condemning them.

Christy Goldfuss, managing director of the White House Council on Environmental Quality, said the Antiquities Act does not give a president authority to undo a designation, a position the courts have upheld. She acknowledged that Congress could take action, though.

“The AMA supports the congressional delegations that work with local stakeholders and Native American tribes on these issues,” Allard said. “Presidents should not bypass Congress on issues of public access to U.S. lands, and the opinions of all stakeholders–gathered through town meetings and formal comments–should factor heavily into the final decision.”

Source: American Motorcyclist Association objects to scope of two new national monuments – American Motorcyclist Association