SUPERBIKE CORSE’S EVENTS 2016/2017 – UPDATE

SUPERBIKE CORSE’S EVENTS 2016

DEC 7th (Wed): Bike Night @ Pizza 900° – Laguna Hills, CA @ 6:30pm [Directions]
UPDATE! => PHOTOS POSTED CLICK HERE TO VIEW!

 SUPERBIKE CORSE’S EVENTS 2017UPDATE!

NEXT=> FEB 1st (Wed): Bike Night @ Pizza 900° – Laguna Hills, CA @ 6:30pm [Directions]

Mar 1st (Wed): Bike Night @ Pizza 900° – Laguna Hills, CA @ 6:30pm [Directions]
Mar 27th (Mon): Superbike Corse Track Day @ Chuckwalla Valley Raceway [Directions]
Nov 6th (Mon): Superbike Corse Track Day @ Chuckwalla Valley Raceway [Directions]

MOTOGP NEWS – LAVERTY: CORNER ENTRY QUICKER ON A SUPERBIKE

MOTOGP NEWS – LAVERTY: CORNER ENTRY QUICKER ON A SUPERBIKE

“I was surprised I could pull time on them on corner entry” – Eugene Laverty

In the space of two weeks in November, Eugene Laverty rode two different MotoGP bikes and a WorldSBK machine.

The Irishman finished his full-time MotoGP career on an Aspar Ducati at Valencia, made his debut on the Aprilia RS-GP in the following test, then began preparations for his 2017 World Superbike return on an Aprilia RSV4 at Jerez.

Laverty’s last day at Jerez also saw him on track at the same time as some MotoGP riders, allowing an interesting comparison.

“Horsepower is the biggest difference, but we can brake pretty strongly,” Laverty said. “The rest – mid-corner to exit and down the straight – they [MotoGP bikes] do get going, but I was surprised I could pull time on them on corner entry.”

The new Milwaukee Aprilia rider added that the character of the WorldSBK Pirelli allows for harder final braking than the MotoGP Michelin.

“It’s not like everyone thinks with the Pirelli front tyre; you need to really squeeze the brake in final braking,” he said. “This year we haven’t been able to and I’ve got into a style of not braking so strongly.

“So I’m improving there, but it takes time after a season of not being able to do that.”

And is there much difference between the RSV4 superbike and its RS-GP ‘big brother’?

“I expected the superbike to feel longer, chunkier and all the rest. But the bike feels really similar. It’s a proper little race bike isn’t it? It’s the tyres and horsepower that are the main difference,” Laverty said.

“The superbike feels easier in one respect because the horsepower is less, but around a track like this the thing is moving around and you are having to work hard.”

Laverty will be an Aprilia MotoGP test rider next season, alongside his WorldSBK race commitments.

Source: MotoGP News – Laverty: Corner entry quicker on a Superbike

MOTOGP, JEREZ TEST: REA FASTER THAN ROSSI’S POLE

MOTOGP, JEREZ TEST: REA FASTER THAN ROSSI’S POLE

The Northern Irishman proves unstoppable for all of the MotoGP riders, Melandri fourth among the Superbikes ahead of Petrucci’s GP17

He isn’t exactly holding back. Johnny Rea had the spotlight on him today at Jerez, powering his Kawasaki to the top of the timesheets. His fellow Superbike riders couldn’t catch him and neither could the MotoGP guys. Yes, you heard correctly! Lying in second place at the end of yesterday, the Northern Irish rider went one better today, stopping the clock on 1’38”721, using a qualifying tyre in the final stages as did all of the SBK riders. His best time was even quicker than the pole set by Valentino Rossi during the Spanish GP.

The first of the chasing pack was  Alvaro Bautista (+0.225), just over two tenths behind Rea, followed by another surprise, in the shape of Chaz Davies on the Ducati (+0.395), on day two of testing for the Welshman and the red bike at Jerez. Marco Melandri is also improving. Despite finishing half a second behind his team-mate, the Italian closed fourth among the SBK riders. After completing 71 laps, during which he worked mainly on the gearing and electronics, he closed ahead of Alex Lowes on the Yamaha. In the final stages, Sykes moved ahead of him to take third place.

Back to MotoGP, and Loris Baz (+0.463) confirmed his competitiveness on the Avintia Ducati, just over two tenths from Bautista. The Frenchman is followed by his team-mate Hector Barbera (+0.821), who set the fastest time yesterday.

Good signs are also coming from the Aprilia camp, and after 41 laps Aleix Espargarò was lying sixth (+0.954), roughly one second from the front. A bittersweet day for the Spaniard, who suffered a crash but was unhurt. He closed just 0.091 ahead of Danilo Petrucci, on track with the new Ducati GP17.

On this second day of testing, Bradley Smith’s apprenticeship with the KTM continues. The former Tech3 rider still has to deal with a gap of around three seconds though. Behind him is Sam Lowes, who completed just 20 laps, still in pain after yesterday’s crash.

Action resumes tomorrow at 10, but rain is forecast overnight as well as around lunchtime.

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Source: MotoGP, Jerez test: Rea faster than Rossi’s pole | GPone.com

APRILIA RSV4-RR GP: PNEUMATIC VALVES & 250HP!

 APRILIA RSV4-RR GP: PNEUMATIC VALVES & 250HP!

Missile from Noale with the RSV that mounts a MotoGP derivative engine. Priced at over 100,000 Euros… engineer included!

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In the area of the “Factory Works” programme, the manufacturer from Noale introduces a track-only version of its RSV-4. The Aprilia Racing “Factory Works” bikes are developed and made available to customers in accordance with the sport championship regulations (Stock, SBK), with different chassis preparation, electronic and engine levels. All of the versions begin with the already exceptional technical base of the Aprilia RSV4 RR. The new GP series, which is a derivative of the “Misano” introduced last year, stands out for the technical solutions it adopts, derived from Bradl and Bautista’s 2015 vehicles. In this case, beginning with the pneumatic valves that enhance the powerful Aprilia V4, already a concentrate of technology in and of itself, especially in this configuration.

The bike is developed by the Noale Racing Department and it is the highest performing special vehicle destined for track use but available to more than just race riders, provided you have a hefty cheque in your pocket. That’s right, because you can take the new RSV4RR-GP to pit lane, but to do so, you will need to put more than 100,000 Euros on the table. The price also includes an engineer who will accompany the customer through the fine-tuning process before heading out onto the track and testing the limits (?) of such a refined engine and chassis architecture.

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The official technical data is still unknown, but one thing has been confirmed: there are 250 horses available, a value worthy of MotoGP that does justice to the symbol printed on the fairings.

NEW HONDA CBR1000RR FIREBLADE DEBUTS AT INTERMOT

NEW HONDA CBR1000RR FIREBLADE DEBUTS AT INTERMOT

Behold, the new Honda Fireblade is here and there’s two versions – the Fireblade SP and SP2

HERE HAS been lots of rumour and speculation about what to expect from the next-generation Honda Fireblade but in a press conference at the Intermot show in Germany, Honda today unveiled its new CBR1000RR Fireblade SP and the homologation special SP2.

Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade SP

 

Key information:

  • 189hp and 196kg wet
  • Ohlins semi-active suspension
  • Inertial measurement unit and a full suite of electronics
  • Cornering ABS
  • Quickshifter and downshift assist
  • RC213V-S derived traction control
  • Inertial measurement unit
  • Riding and power modes

 

Since the ‘Blade was last updated, superbikes have become increasingly powerful and technologically advanced, so it’s not surprising that the latest incarnation of Honda’s flagship sports bike sees the Fireblade gaining a comprehensive suite of electronics and a hike in power.

Honda says its main focus when developing the 2017 Fireblade was power-to-weight, which were principles of the original ‘Blade, released 25 years ago. It says the focus on this machine has been cornering, acceleration and braking. Here it is in more detail:

Engine

The Fireblade is still powered by a 999.8cc inline four-cylinder engine with a bore and stroke of 76 x 55.1mm.

Honda says the CBR’s low-end torque and power are improved, along with a significant increase in top end power. The new ‘Blade makes a claimed 189hp at 12,500rpm – an 11hp increase over the outgoing model.

The engine revs harder and higher than before (up to 13,000rpm), and uses a higher compression ratio (up from 12.3:1 to 13:1) along with revised valve lift and cam timing.

According to Honda, the pistons have an optimised wall thickness and a new crown design, and the surface finishing of the piston ring grooves has been modified to improve performance and efficiency.

Throttle bore has increased by 2mm to 48mm, with the intake funnels shaped to provide a linear throttle response.

The engine weighs a claimed 2kg less than the previous motor, thanks to use of magnesium covers and ‘detail redesign’ – shorter bolts, water hose and water hose bands.

The radiator is 30mm narrower, 30cc smaller and a claimed 100g lighter, and Honda says it provides identical heat dissipation to the previous rad.

The exhaust silencer is made from titanium, as is the 16 litre fuel tank. Both are intended to cut weight and aid mass centralisation.

The slipper clutch has been redesigned to offer less load and more feel at the lever.

Chassis, suspension and brakes

We saw in recent spy photos that the new Fireblade looks very similar to the previous model and appears to have the same frame, although now we know that it’s not gone unchanged.

Honda says its adjusted the frame’s rigidity balance, so it’s now 10% more flexible in the torsional plane – a change designed to make the chassis feel more reactive. It’s also got thinner walls to save a claimed 500g. Honda also says the aluminium subframe is also 800g lighter.

The swingarm is claimed to be stiffer and lighter thanks to adjustments made to its thickness at various points.

At 1,404mm, the 2017 Fireblade’s wheelbase has been shortened by 6mm the seat height has increased by 11mm to 831mm.

The bike has gained an electronic steering damper.

Stopping power at the front wheel is taken care of by a set of four-piston radially mounted Brembo monoblocs with newly developed hight coefficient of friction pads, which Honda says are suited to aggressive riding.

The wheels are new too, with a Y-shape design, that saves approximately 100g. The front wears a 120/70 tyres and the rear is shod with a 190/50 R17.

 

Other

The CBR1000RR also gains a full colour TFT liquid crystal dash, which adjusts to the ambient light. The dash information displayed on the dash depends on which one of its three modes its in – Street, Circuit or Mechanic.

All the lights are LED, and the twin front headlights have high/low beam on both sides.

Honda says the two best words best used to describe the styling of the new CBR1000RR are ‘minimal’ and ‘dynamic’. Honda says its concentrated on reducing the surface area of the upper and middle fairings, and has shaved 24mm off the width of the upper fairing and 18mm from the side fairing.

Syling-wise, we think it looks evolutionary, not revolutionary but it has been sharpened up and feels like a logical next step in the Fireblade’s design. From the side it has echoes of the CBR600RR.

Honda CBR1000RR Fireblade SP2

Read more on the SP2 here: New Honda Fireblade | Visordown

“SUPERSPORT 300” CLASS ADDED TO WSBK CHAMPIONSHIP

“SUPERSPORT 300” CLASS ADDED TO WSBK CHAMPIONSHIP

The FIM and Dorna have agreed on a new entry class for the World Superbike championship. A Supersport 300 series has been created to house the burgeoning market of lightweight sports machines, such as the Yamaha YZF-R3 and the KTM RC390.

The concept for the class came about after consultation with manufacturers. Motorcycle manufacturers have seen sales of 600cc supersports bikes plummeting, while sales of lightweight machines have been booming.

More and more manufacturers have been entering the class, though each with slightly different machines and different engine capacities.

That presents the series with its first major challenge: balancing different motorcycle concepts against one another, while still ensuring that racing remains affordable.

For 2017, four machines have been homologated: the Yamaha YZF-R3, the KTM RC390, the Honda CBR500R (previously raced in the European Junior Cup) and the Kawasaki Ninja 300, one of the first bikes to be launched in the segment.

Performance balancing the concepts will initially be done via minimum weights and maximum revs, with adjustments made by agreement in the Superbike Commission, the governing body of the series.

In keeping with previous performance balancing concepts, such a decision is only likely to be taken if one bike is either obviously dominating or lagging severely behind.

The bikes to be raced must remain very close to stock. The engines and frames must remain virtually unaltered, with only the removal of secondary throttle valves permitted.

Electronics must be either the stock kit fitted, or a separate, homologated race kit from the manufacturer, or a Dorna-provided special Supersport kit.

Datalogging is severely limited, as are changes to the suspension. Exhaust may be changed, but must retain the same number of silencers in the same position as on the road bike.

“This new platform will be the perfect environment for developing future talent,” said Vito Ippolito, President of FIM.

“The intention of WorldSSP 300 is to create a benchmark for National Championships to follow. We want to offer an environment that is regulated and relatively equal in which future talent can grow, and where manufacturers can accompany young riders as they take their first steps towards stardom.”

“The focus is to have an affordable Series for these young competitors,” added Javier Alonso, WorldSBK Executive Director.

“There has been great interest for low-capacity motorcycles in this sport and the new WorldSSP 300 class strives to offer that. It will be promoted by Manufacturers as an easily accessible championship, the best possible platform to grow future stars where Manufacturers can accompany riders from an early age and as they progress through their career.”

A full list of the provisional Technical Regulations for the WorldSSP 300 Championship can be found here.

Source: FIM; Photo KTM

 

Source: “Supersport 300” Class Added to WSBK Championship

MOTOGP 2017 CALENDAR: BEGINS ON 26 MARCH IN QATAR, 18 RACES

MOTOGP 2017 CALENDAR: BEGINS ON 26 MARCH IN QATAR, 18 RACES

No new events next season, Mugello to take place on 4 June, Misano on 10 September

The FIM has today published a provisional MotoGP calendar for 2017. There are no new races planned for next year and the championship will again stage 18 Grand Prix, reconfirming this season’s circuits.

The championship will get underway on 26 March with the night race in Qatar, which will quite probably clash with the opening Formula 1 race in Australia. The final round will be held at Valencia, as is tradition, on 12 November.

As we’ve already mentioned, all of this year’s races have been reconfirmed for next season and will take place in almost exactly the same order, the only (small) change being that the Czech and Austrian races are inverted, with Brno scheduled to take place before the Red Bull Ring.

Right now, the only doubts concern the Silverstone and Malaysia races, with both events subject to contract renewals, though this should be just a formality. Also because, with regard to Great Britain, the Circuit of Wales project appears to have been abandoned, making Silverstone the only racetrack currently able to host the world championship.

Italian fans should take note of the dates of 4 June and 10 September, when the Italian GP and San Marino GP are set to take place at Mugello and Misano respectively.

Source: MotoGP, 2017 calendar: to begin on 26 March in Qatar, 18 races | GPone.com

MOTOGP NEWS – MOTOGP WING BAN WORDING

MOTOGP WING BAN WORDING

MotoGP’s 2017 ban on aerodynamic wings will be enforced by the following rule, agreed by the Grand Prix Commission at Misano:

“Devices or shapes protruding from the fairing or bodywork and not integrated in the body streamlining (e.g. wings, fins, bulges, etc.) that may provide an aerodynamic effect (e.g. providing downforce, disrupting aerodynamic wake, etc.) are not allowed.

“The Technical Director will be the sole judge of whether a device or fairing design falls into the above definition”.

Giving the final say to the Technical Director avoids the need for an exact definition of such ‘devices or shapes’ to be written into the rules, although it was added that:

‘Furthermore, to avoid that the front of the fairing is wing-shaped, with unpredictable safety results, the front of the fairing cannot protrude more than 150mm beyond a vertical line drawn through the front wheel spindle. (It should be noted that all fairings in current use already comply with this).’

Interestingly, the new rule does not ban the use of aerodynamic devices if they are enclosed within the fairing or bodywork…

Source: MotoGP News – MotoGP wing ban wording

FREE DIGITAL COPY OF “FAVORITE RIDES & DESTINATIONS”

FREE DIGITAL COPY OF “FAVORITE RIDES & DESTINATIONS”

Favorite Rides & Destinations is a new, free digital publication from the editors of Rider magazine. It includes the very best of Rider’s touring features and Favorite Ride stories, inspiring photography, reviews of useful products and expert tips to help you have memorable touring experiences.

The premiere issue launched last spring, and issue #2 is now available. If you receive Rider’s free e-newsletter, you get Favorite Rides & Destinations automatically. Click on the link below to view the latest issue, read the premiere issue or sign up to be automatically alerted when new issues arrive.

FavoriteRidesandDestinations.com

For your FREE COPY, please click the link to complete the form: Favorite Rides & Destinations

https://tpc.googlesyndication.com/simgad/9345352759598444865

SPOT GEN3 SATELLITE TRACKER REVIEW | Rider Magazine

SPOT GEN3 SATELLITE TRACKER REVIEW

The Spot Gen3 is a rugged, waterproof device that comes with a velcro strap and carabiner for attaching it to your jacket or backpack.

Greg Drevenstedt
August 16, 2016

A few years ago, a friend of mine split off from the group after an all-day adventure ride and headed home. But he never made it. As darkness fell, his wife tried reaching him on his cellphone, but he didn’t answer. The next morning a highway patrol officer found my friend on the side of a mountain road, out of cell range. Fortunately, his injuries were minor, but he spent 18 very uncomfortable hours trapped under his BMW R 1200 GS.

With the Spot Gen3’s Tracking function, family and friends can follow your progress in real time.

Situations like that are the primary reasons to carry the Spot Gen3 Satellite Personal Tracker. Some of our favorite test roads pass through remote areas, away from crowds, traffic and cell towers. If someone were to crash and get badly hurt, being able to quickly notify emergency responders could be the difference between life and death. When you hit the Spot’s S.O.S. button, the device contacts the GEOS International Emergency Response Center via satellite, and GEOS sends your GPS coordinates to local responders (similar to calling 911). S.O.S. monitoring via GEOS is included in the Spot annual service plan (see below), but the costs associated with a rescue may be billed to the user. For $17.95/year, the add-on GEOS Member Benefit covers up to $100,000 in search and rescue expenses.

Fortunately, we’ve never had to use the Spot’s S.O.S. function. The Gen3 also has a Help button, which notifies your primary and secondary contacts in the event of a non-emergency situation, such as running out of gas. If you sign up for the SPOT Assist Roadside plan (starting at $30/year), pressing the Help button contacts a third-party roadside assistance…

Read More at: Spot Gen3 Satellite Tracker Review | Rider Magazine

CALIFORNIA BECOMES 1st STATE TO LEGALLY RECOGNIZE LANE SPLITTING

CALIFORNIA BECOMES 1st STATE TO LEGALLY RECOGNIZE LANE SPLITTING
Gov. Brown signs A.B. 51, directing California Highway Patrol to draft guidelines

PICKERINGTON, Ohio – Gov. Jerry Brown signed A.B. 51 into law today, making California the first state to legally recognize lane splitting, the practice in which motorcyclists ride between lanes of traffic.

The bill, sponsored by Assemblymembers Bill Quirk (D-Hayward) and Tom Lackey (R- Palmdale), grants the California Highway Patrol the authority to develop and issue lane-splitting guidelines in consultation with motorcycle safety groups and riders.

“This is great news for motorcyclists in California and throughout the country,” said Rob Dingman, president and CEO of the American Motorcyclist Association. “The California Assembly and the governor have taken a huge step in formally recognizing a practice that has been is use for decades.

“Lane splitting keeps riders safer by eliminating their exposure to rear-end collisions, and it helps ease congestion by effectively removing motorcycles from the traffic lanes.”

Studies by the University of California at Berkeley show that splitting lanes is a relatively safe maneuver when both the motorcyclist and nearby drivers know the law and adhere to safe and prudent driving practices.

In 2012, the CHP developed guidelines for splitting lanes, posting them online in 2013 and including them in the Motorcycle Handbook distributed by the Department of Motor Vehicles. However, a citizen complained in 2014 that the guidelines were “underground regulations” put together by a state agency, rather than the legislature. So the CHP and DMV removed them.

A.B. 51 clarifies that the CHP does have authority to develop educational guidelines on lane splitting. The law also removes the practice from the legal gray area, where it was neither expressly prohibited nor approved.

Several other states, including Nevada, Georgia, Washington, Oregon and Texas, have considered legislation during the past two years that would have made lane splitting legal, with certain restrictions.

“We hope that other states will follow California’s lead on this issue,” Dingman said. “The AMA is here to support individuals, groups and legislators who want lane splitting made legal in their states, too.”

The AMA’s official position on lane splitting can be found here.

Source: California becomes first state to legally recognize lane splitting – American Motorcyclist Association

MOTOGP RIDERS CRITICAL OF PIT-TO-RIDER COMMUNICATION PLAN

MOTOGP RIDERS CRITICAL OF PIT-TO-RIDER COMM PLAN

Championship leader Marc Marquez and British duo Cal Crutchlow and Bradley Smith have all said they don’t support the extension to pit-to-rider communication MotoGP is developing for next year.

The new system is set to give crew chiefs around 20 types of messages, including information about rival competitors, that can be relayed to their riders.

Honda’s Marquez said he is against the idea as the ability for rider to make their own decisions “is one of the nicest things” in MotoGP.

“Okay, we have a team behind us but then on the track the rider is alone and he has to make the decision,” said Marquez.

“For that reason the teams pay us to be the fastest, to defeat every time and for me one of the things that I don’t like in F1 is most of the times the teams have too much effect on the race.

“So for me, if you do the correct meetings before the race, if you are clever enough on the bike, also experience, it’s okay.

“For example in Germany I was the guy who changed the bike in the correct time – maybe it will be the opposite. But this is also the nicest things from the race.”

Future KTM man Smith backed up Marquez’s point.

“Not a fan [of the idea], I still think that the sole element of the rider making his own choices and calculations is that makes flag-to-flag racing much more interesting.

“If you bring in dash communication, it’s taking away the fun of flag-to-flag, it’s all part of how we should do it.”

Crutchlow, also against the proposed plans, argued communication in the other direction would be more useful.

“The problem is, how do I send something back? It’s difficult to text,” he joked.

“It’s okay reading something, but the information is, the rider to the crew chief, more than the crew chief to the rider.

“What can he tell me, for example? ‘It is drying up’? F**k, you’re not on the bike, mate. You can’t really make that call as much as anyone just because somebody else has pitted.

“I don’t know what they can tell at the end of the day, I don’t think it’s necessarily a good thing.”

Source: MotoGP riders critical of pit-to-rider communication plan

NEW! SUPERBIKE CORSE NOW OFFERS VALET SERVICE FOR YOUR MOTORCYCLE(S)!

NEW! SUPERBIKE CORSE NOW PROVIDING VALET SERVICE FOR YOUR MOTORCYCLE(S)!

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If you love your motorcycle(s) but just don’t have the space and/or security to keep them at your home, condo, or apartment complex, then Superbike Corse has the solution to your needs by offering you their motorcycle valet service.  This new ‘Superbike Valet’ service is conveniently located freeway close in a secured facility for ease of drop-off and pick-up.  The Superbike Valet Starter Kit will contain (1 ea) Baxley Sport Chock, (1 ea) Battery Tender, and (1 ea) Sportbike Cover.  This valet service location also makes it convenient to have Superbike Corse’s top mechanics perform maintenance or repair servicing tasks, performance mods, detailing, and track preparations on your bike while at the valet facility. Call 949-305-5563 for more information.

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STONER SAYS MODERN ELECTRONICS HAVE ROBBED MOTOGP OF “FINESSE”

STONER SAYS MODERN ELECTRONICS HAVE ROBBED MOTOGP OF “FINESSE”

Two-time MotoGP champion Casey Stoner believes that the current level of electronic aids prevalent in the sport today have robbed riders of the need to use “finesse”.

The 2016 season marks the first that MotoGP has used a standard electronics package, produced by Magneti Marelli, ending the two-tier system that was in place from 2012 to 2015 with the ‘Factory’ and ‘Open’ classes.

This was introduced with the goal of restricting costs by stopping manufacturers developing their own bespoke software, as well as bridging the gap between the works and independent teams.

But Stoner believes that, even with the current package introduced this season, the help a rider gets managing traction out of corners is still enough to have a negative effect on the racing.

In particular, he says that the close lap times that have been a common feature of qualifying sessions in the 2016 season are a direct result of electronic aids.

“Electronics are why you see MotoGP lap times so close in qualifying, so you think, wow, so many people can go fast,” Stoner wrote in an editorial for Australian Motor Cycle News.

“But in qualifying all the riders have to do is brake late, get the bike to turn, then pin it and let the electronics do the rest. There’s no more finesse.

“During a race, when you can’t brake that late every lap and get it perfect, that’s when you see the gaps grow so much through the pack.

“Electronics help massively for those riders who can’t control the rear like others can. Back in 2006 or 2007, if you had more finesse you’d pick up the bike out of the corner and almost pass the other guy halfway down the straight.

“Or maybe the other guy would slip and slide and mess up the exit, so you’d get a run on them and you’d pretty much have the pass done before you got to the next corner.”

Similar riding styles

Stoner also said that riders’ increased dependence on electronics has meant that riding styles have converged – with the emphasis now firmly on late braking to find speed, to the exclusion of other styles.

“Different riders [used to] set up their bikes very differently,” explained the Australian.

“Someone like Dani [Pedrosa] liked to have his bike set up for the middle of the corner to the exit and not much good on the entry, but he could get the corner squared off so well and get so much drive that he’d come up next to you down the straight.

“Everyone’s style shone through back then, now it’s heading more to one particular style.

“No one can make the difference on the exit – you can hear them all hitting the throttle at the same part of the turn and driving out – so they just make a big stab on the brakes.

“It’s all about who brakes the latest and who is willing to take the biggest risk.”

Source: Stoner says modern electronics have robbed MotoGP of “finesse”

REEVU MOTORCYCLE HELMETS – THE WORLD’S FIRST REAR VIEW HELMET: NOW AVAILABLE @ SUPERBIKE CORSE!

REEVU HELMETS – THE WORLD’S FIRST REAR VIEW HELMET: NOW AVAILABLE @ SUPERBIKE CORSE!

Reevu motorcycle helmets prevent accidents with their rear view system – a new level of safety

 

The World’s first motorsport helmet with a built-in, FULLY ADJUSTABLE rear-view mirror system is being launched by North East England based Global brand leader in rear-view helmets, Reevu.

Motorbike helmets serve one purpose – to protect. Reevu have taken this concept further, producing the world’s first motorbike helmets with an integrated rear vision system that helps prevent accidents. A new age in motorcycle helmets has arrived.

The latest Reevu helmet has been developed over the last 30 months in response to market demand for a motorsport helmet with a fully adjustable optic part allowing the wearer to tailor the rear-view mirror system to their precise requirements. The internationally patented development of the Reevu helmet will see sales of the new helmet get underway shortly across North America, Europe and the Far East / Australasia.

The innovative and world-leading technology allows the wearer to view the road behind using a set of bulletproof, coated optics, that are now fully adjustable for a bespoke fit.

Reevu, which has its head office in Washington and manufacturing plants in Europe and Asia, was established in 1999, and is represented in most international markets through exclusive distributors.

The launch of this latest Reevu motorsport helmet is the culmination of ten years of European R&D, all of which has been privately funded.

Reevu products are a unique revolutionary invention in the helmet market. This displacement innovation is taking market share all around the world.  Superbike Corse is now a part of this global phenomena and is the official Reevu Helmet distributor in Orange County.  If you would like to purchase this extraordinary helmet email Drew Immiti at drew@sbkcorse.com  or contact Superbike Corse through their Facebook or Website pageYellow, red, black and white Reevu helmet

Source: Reevu motorbike helmets. Reevu – the world’s first rear view helmet