DISCOVERY CHANNEL TO AIR THREE-PART MINI-SERIES ‘HARLEY AND THE DAVIDSONS’ ON SEPT 5-7

DISCOVERY CHANNEL TO AIR THREE-PART MINI-SERIES ‘HARLEY AND THE DAVIDSONS’ ON SEPT 5-7

Discovery Channel is sending us back in time to the beginning of what evolved into one of America’s most well-known motorcycle brands: the Harley-Davidson Motor Co. A mini-series, “Harley and the Davidsons,” includes three two-hour installments. Part 1 will air at 9 p.m. ET on Sept. 5. Parts two and three air on Sept. 6, and Sept. 7.

The story provides insight into the successes and struggles of company founders, Walter and Arthur Davidson and Bill Harley.

The cast includes Michiel Huisman (“Game of Thrones”) as AMA Hall of Famer Walter Davidson, Robert Aramayo (“Game of Thrones”) as AMA Hall of Famer William (Bill) Harley, and Bug Hall (“The Little Rascals”) playing the role of AMA Hall of Famer Arthur Davidson.

Hall took a few minutes to speak with the AMA about his passion for motorcycling and his role in the series.

American Motorcyclist: I was told you ride. What do you ride?
Bug Hall: I was a BMW guy my whole life. I had R1200Cs and R1200Rs and owned a few other bikes over the years. Had a [Suzuki] GSXR as a teenager, had a couple Hondas. In total, I probably have wrecked about 12 bikes over the years.

AM: How long have you been riding?
BH: I started in my early teens. My dad put me on Honda Shadow when I was 13 or 14. I couldn’t figure out the friction zone on the clutch. It was stall, stall, stall. Then one night, I had a dream that I was fluidly riding, then next day got on it, and it was like it just clicked. I didn’t own or drive a car until about four or five years ago. Everywhere I went, I went on a bike–back and forth across America. I’ve roughly estimated that I’ve hit the million-mile mark.

AM: Where is your favorite place to ride?
BH: Oh man, come on. That’s an impossible question! The Pacific coast is beautiful. The reality, though, is the 10 [Interstate 10]. Jump on it in California and take it to Florida. You’ll see every type of scenery. At least half of my million miles were gathered on the 10.

AM: What drew you to this role? Does this role hold any significance to you because you’re a rider?
BH: First and foremost, I heard that they were doing this story. That’s what got me out of what I call my “mini-retirement.” I had been focusing on writing, and, every now and then, my guys would call and try to entice me out of retirement. When they called about this, I went: “Yeah I absolutely have to take a look at this.”

What really appealed to me was Arthur. He was like me. I’m a Texas boy who loves to fish, the peaceful quiet of nature and being by myself. Arthur really was that quiet guy. When he was in sales mode, he was a very different guy. He was fair, honest and just, but could sell you anything. It’s like a superpower he’s using for good. I’ve never been that guy. I’m awkward in conversations. I’d like to think he was, too, but learned to talk to people and sell things. That was really inspiring to me the more I studied him.

Bug Hall plays Arthur Davidson in the series.

AM: How much did you know much about Arthur or the company before you took the role?
BH: When we were studying these guys, one of the details I first noticed is that these guys [Arthur, Walter and Bill], in every photo we saw of them, buttoned their bottom button of their suits. We looked up pictures of other guys in Milwaukee at the time, and it wasn’t common. In some way, they were rebelling against the business world. These were country boys. There was a rebellion in all of them, and I think that’s what made their machines so great. They made it their way. Bill Harley was a genius of an engineer. He didn’t make things that were already out there. He redefined them. These guys were on a different level, but yet they were country boys. I didn’t know very much of any of that until I took the project on.

AM: Where was the series shot?
BH: In Romania. The reality is we wanted to be as authentic as possible, and Milwaukee [where Harley-Davidson is based] has built up since that time. It doesn’t look like it did at the turn of the [20th] century. It was really a matter of authenticity. America has moved on into the future, but we did go up to Milwaukee and spend time with guys at Harley-Davidson and tour the factory. It was a lot of fun going to the museum and hearing from the curator.

AM: How closely does the series stick to the true storyline and how much is embellished?
BH: In 25 years, I’ve never worked with a group of people that were so careful with regard to authenticity. Every nut and bolt was checked and triple checked. The men themselves and the story. Of course, there are sections that had to be condensed. For the most part, it is so spot on. We were working with people that cared so much.

AM: Are the Harley and Davidson families involved in the series at all? Did they help contribute history or even provide bikes or props?
BH: No, the family is not involved. But, as actors, we were lucky enough to get to meet Willie G. Davidson [AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Legend] during our trip to the factory

Source: Discovery Channel to air three-part mini-series ‘Harley and the Davidsons’ on Sept. 5-7

CALIFORNIA ASSEMBLY VOTE BRINGS STATE ONE STEP CLOSER TO AUTHORIZED LANE SPLITTING

CALIFORNIA ASSEMBLY VOTE BRINGS STATE ONE STEP CLOSER TO AUTHORIZED LANE SPLITTING

Gov. Brown expected to sign bill that empowers Highway Patrol to draft guidelines

August 05, 2016

PICKERINGTON, Ohio – California is on track to become the first state to formally recognize lane splitting as a legal maneuver for motorcyclists.

Assembly Bill 51, sponsored by Assembly members Bill Quirk and Tom Lackey, authorizes the California Highway Patrol to devise educational

The bill passed the Assembly 74-0 on Aug. 3, with six Assembly members not voting. The state Senate had earlier passed the bill 38-0. Gov. Jerry Brown is expected to the sign the bill when it reaches his desk.

The American Motorcyclist Association fully supports this legislation.

“We are extremely pleased that this bill received such overwhelming support in the Assembly,” said Wayne Allard, AMA vice president for government relations. “These guidelines will provide motorcyclists and motorists, alike, with the information they need to safely interact in traffic.

“At the same time, we hope that California will serve as an example to other states. Research shows that, done responsibly, lane splitting can reduce traffic congestion and reduce the likelihood of motorcyclists being struck from behind,” Allard said.

A.B. 51 defines lane splitting as “driving a motorcycle that has two wheels in contact with the ground between rows of stopped or moving vehicles in the same lane.”

The bill also requires the California Highway Patrol to consult with other agencies and organizations with an interest in road safety and motorcyclist behavior in developing the guidelines for responsible lane splitting.

Two state-sponsored studies conducted by the University of California Berkeley concluded that lane splitting is a relatively safe maneuver when both the motorcyclist and nearby drivers know the law and adhere to “safe and prudent” practices.

Lane-splitting riders were less likely to be rear-ended by another vehicle than were other motorcyclists, according to the studies. And lane-splitting motorcyclists involved in crashes were notably less likely than other motorcyclists in crashes to suffer head injury, torso injury or fatal injury than other motorcyclists.

The studies also found that there was no meaningful increase in injuries until traffic speed exceeded 50 mph and that speed differentials between lane-splitting motorcyclists and other traffic were not associated with changes in injury occurrence until the differential exceeded 15 mph.

Those findings closely align with lane-splitting guidelines posted on the California Highway Patrol website in 2013 and removed in 2014 after a complaint from one Sacramento resident, who argued that the Highway Patrol was, in effect, making law.

California is the only U.S. state where lane splitting is permitted. Current state law neither prohibits nor specifically allows the maneuver.

In many countries, lane splitting and filtering are normal practices for motorcyclists, Allard said. Particularly in the highly urbanized areas of Europe and Asia, motorcycle and scooter operators are expected to pass between conventional vehicles and advance to the front of the group.

The American Motorcyclist Association’s complete position statement on lane splitting can be found here:  www.americanmotorcyclist.com/About-The-AMA/lane-splitting-1.

guidelines for splitting lanes “in a manner that would ensure the safety of the motorcyclist, drivers and passengers.”

Source: California Assembly vote brings state one step closer to formally authorized lane splitting – American Motorcyclist Association

MOTOGP RIDERS CRITICAL OF PIT-TO-RIDER COMMUNICATION PLAN

MOTOGP RIDERS CRITICAL OF PIT-TO-RIDER COMM PLAN

Championship leader Marc Marquez and British duo Cal Crutchlow and Bradley Smith have all said they don’t support the extension to pit-to-rider communication MotoGP is developing for next year.

The new system is set to give crew chiefs around 20 types of messages, including information about rival competitors, that can be relayed to their riders.

Honda’s Marquez said he is against the idea as the ability for rider to make their own decisions “is one of the nicest things” in MotoGP.

“Okay, we have a team behind us but then on the track the rider is alone and he has to make the decision,” said Marquez.

“For that reason the teams pay us to be the fastest, to defeat every time and for me one of the things that I don’t like in F1 is most of the times the teams have too much effect on the race.

“So for me, if you do the correct meetings before the race, if you are clever enough on the bike, also experience, it’s okay.

“For example in Germany I was the guy who changed the bike in the correct time – maybe it will be the opposite. But this is also the nicest things from the race.”

Future KTM man Smith backed up Marquez’s point.

“Not a fan [of the idea], I still think that the sole element of the rider making his own choices and calculations is that makes flag-to-flag racing much more interesting.

“If you bring in dash communication, it’s taking away the fun of flag-to-flag, it’s all part of how we should do it.”

Crutchlow, also against the proposed plans, argued communication in the other direction would be more useful.

“The problem is, how do I send something back? It’s difficult to text,” he joked.

“It’s okay reading something, but the information is, the rider to the crew chief, more than the crew chief to the rider.

“What can he tell me, for example? ‘It is drying up’? F**k, you’re not on the bike, mate. You can’t really make that call as much as anyone just because somebody else has pitted.

“I don’t know what they can tell at the end of the day, I don’t think it’s necessarily a good thing.”

Source: MotoGP riders critical of pit-to-rider communication plan

IANNONE DEFIED MICHELIN ADVICE WITH WINNING TIRE CHOICE

IANNONE DEFIED MICHELIN ADVICE WITH WINNING TIRE CHOICE

Austrian Grand Prix winner Andrea Iannone says he went against recommendations from Michelin and his own engineers in making the crucial tyre choice for the race.

Iannone, starting the race from pole position, opted for a soft front and medium rear tyre selection for the 28-lap event, whereas all of his main rivals went with a medium front and a hard rear.

But the Italian’s gamble paid off, Iannone passing teammate Andrea Dovizioso and maintaining the gap in the final stint of the race despite the softer tyre selection.

“It’s a very strong risk, when you know you have a very good chance to fight for the top and everybody start with the hard [rear] – and you start with the soft [rear],” Iannone said after the race.

“Yesterday I worked with [both] and I think the hard one for me had a big drop after six-seven laps, for me was very difficult to manage, especially on the right side.

“And when in FP4 I tried a small long run with the softer one, I finished with 22 laps and my last three laps were [1m]24.2, 23.9, 23.9.

“When I come back in the box, I talk with my engineers and with Michelin, I explain my feeling. I thought this tyre is better for the race. But Michelin first time did not agree 100 percent… but I today believed in me.”

Iannone revealed he nearly went back on his tyre choice in the pre-race build-up, but ultimately stuck with his original preference.

“In the first moment, I decide – okay, I start like everybody. But at the last [moment], I was sure of my work with my engineers with my team, and I used the soft one.

“My engineers asked me: ‘But why, why do you want these tyres? You can go with everybody and I think we also will have a good possibility.’

“I believed in myself and I thought it was a very strong decision.”

Managing the race

Iannone also confirmed that he held back in the opening stint of the race, managing tyrewear and fuel consumption, before retaking the lead and storming to victory in the closing stages.

“It was an incredible race,” he said. “Andrea [Dovizioso] rode very fast, had very strong braking points, also Jorge [Lorenzo] from the beginning of the race pushed very fast to stay in front of me.

“I tried to manage the best the race, didn’t want to push a lot. It was very important to manage the tyres, not use them 100%, not to spin, not to slide. And I think that strategy was fantastic.

“Also, I managed the fuel, I used less fuel for half-race and after I switched the map, the bike pushed a little bit more. With the team from the box, the strategy was perfect and I’m very happy.”

Source: Iannone defied Michelin advice with winning tyre choice

NEW! SUPERBIKE CORSE NOW OFFERS VALET SERVICE FOR YOUR MOTORCYCLE(S)!

NEW! SUPERBIKE CORSE NOW PROVIDING VALET SERVICE FOR YOUR MOTORCYCLE(S)!

sbk.valet.card_1790x1200.jpg

If you love your motorcycle(s) but just don’t have the space and/or security to keep them at your home, condo, or apartment complex, then Superbike Corse has the solution to your needs by offering you their motorcycle valet service.  This new ‘Superbike Valet’ service is conveniently located freeway close in a secured facility for ease of drop-off and pick-up.  The Superbike Valet Starter Kit will contain (1 ea) Baxley Sport Chock, (1 ea) Battery Tender, and (1 ea) Sportbike Cover.  This valet service location also makes it convenient to have Superbike Corse’s top mechanics perform maintenance or repair servicing tasks, performance mods, detailing, and track preparations on your bike while at the valet facility. Call 949-305-5563 for more information.

Resized_20160515_1759431

BILL WOULD CLOSE 23 MILLION ACRES TO OHV USERS IN WESTERN STATES – Contact your senators today!!!

BILL WOULD CLOSE 23 MILLION ACRES TO OHV USERS IN WESTERN STATES – Contact your senators today!!!

On June 6, U.S. Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse (D-R.I.) introduced S. 3022, the Northern Rockies Ecosystem Protection Act. This legislation, previously introduced in 2010 and 2013, would inappropriately designate as federal Wilderness 23 million acres in Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington and Wyoming.

This Wilderness designation would make the 23 million acres off-limits to off-highway-vehicle riders, forever close thousands of miles of legal trails currently enjoyed by tens of thousands responsible OHV enthusiasts and their families and friends, and severely impact scores of local communities that depend on recreational tourism for their survival.

The American Motorcyclist Association supports the designation of Wilderness that meets the strict criteria set forth in the Wilderness Act of 1964. However, the vast majority of the 23 million acres in question do not meet the strict definition of Wilderness established by Congress.

Notably, the bill’s current sponsor (who represents residents of Rhode Island) and cosponsors do not represent any citizens in the affected areas, a strategy that ensures they do not invoke the wrath of their constituents.

Please fill out the form below and click the red “Submit” button to let your representative know that you oppose this inappropriate action.

Numerous studies have been conducted that indicate properly managed public lands ensure recreational opportunities for all citizens, are essential to mitigating devastating wildfire risks and that Wilderness designations cost local economies vital jobs and tax revenue.

The motorcycling community must rally together and stop S. 3022 in its tracks. This bill already has eight cosponsors in the Senate.

If this bill is signed into law, the effect on the OHV community would be devastating for generations to come.

Please contact your senators immediately and urge them to oppose S. 3022 so future generations of OHV enthusiasts and their families will have the opportunity to enjoy the public lands in Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington and Wyoming.

Now more than ever, it is crucial that you and your riding friends become members of the AMA to help protect our riding freedoms. More members mean more clout against the opponents of motorcycling. That support will help fight for your rights – on the road, trail and racetrack and in the halls of government. If you are a motorcycle rider, join the AMA at www.americanmotorcyclist.com/membership/join.

Source: Send a Message

STONER SAYS MODERN ELECTRONICS HAVE ROBBED MOTOGP OF “FINESSE”

STONER SAYS MODERN ELECTRONICS HAVE ROBBED MOTOGP OF “FINESSE”

Two-time MotoGP champion Casey Stoner believes that the current level of electronic aids prevalent in the sport today have robbed riders of the need to use “finesse”.

The 2016 season marks the first that MotoGP has used a standard electronics package, produced by Magneti Marelli, ending the two-tier system that was in place from 2012 to 2015 with the ‘Factory’ and ‘Open’ classes.

This was introduced with the goal of restricting costs by stopping manufacturers developing their own bespoke software, as well as bridging the gap between the works and independent teams.

But Stoner believes that, even with the current package introduced this season, the help a rider gets managing traction out of corners is still enough to have a negative effect on the racing.

In particular, he says that the close lap times that have been a common feature of qualifying sessions in the 2016 season are a direct result of electronic aids.

“Electronics are why you see MotoGP lap times so close in qualifying, so you think, wow, so many people can go fast,” Stoner wrote in an editorial for Australian Motor Cycle News.

“But in qualifying all the riders have to do is brake late, get the bike to turn, then pin it and let the electronics do the rest. There’s no more finesse.

“During a race, when you can’t brake that late every lap and get it perfect, that’s when you see the gaps grow so much through the pack.

“Electronics help massively for those riders who can’t control the rear like others can. Back in 2006 or 2007, if you had more finesse you’d pick up the bike out of the corner and almost pass the other guy halfway down the straight.

“Or maybe the other guy would slip and slide and mess up the exit, so you’d get a run on them and you’d pretty much have the pass done before you got to the next corner.”

Similar riding styles

Stoner also said that riders’ increased dependence on electronics has meant that riding styles have converged – with the emphasis now firmly on late braking to find speed, to the exclusion of other styles.

“Different riders [used to] set up their bikes very differently,” explained the Australian.

“Someone like Dani [Pedrosa] liked to have his bike set up for the middle of the corner to the exit and not much good on the entry, but he could get the corner squared off so well and get so much drive that he’d come up next to you down the straight.

“Everyone’s style shone through back then, now it’s heading more to one particular style.

“No one can make the difference on the exit – you can hear them all hitting the throttle at the same part of the turn and driving out – so they just make a big stab on the brakes.

“It’s all about who brakes the latest and who is willing to take the biggest risk.”

Source: Stoner says modern electronics have robbed MotoGP of “finesse”

DUCATI SIGNS MELANDRI, CONFIRMS DAVIES FOR 2017

DUCATI SIGNS MELANDRI, CONFIRMS DAVIES FOR 2017

Ducati has announced Chaz Davies and Marco Melandri as its line-up for the 2017 World Superbike season, the latter replacing Davide Giugliano.

Former 250cc champion and MotoGP runner-up Marco Melandri competed in WSBK between 2011 and 2014 and ended every season within the top four.

The Italian scored 19 victories in four years and then rejoined MotoGP for 2015, only to depart from Aprilia in the middle of the season.

While Melandri missed out on a WSBK seat for 2016, he had been linked to the Pata-backed Yamaha squad next year – only to end up with Ducati for his return to the series.

“I’m really excited to come back to racing, it’s a dream come true,” Melandri stated.

“I always said I was only interested in a top bike and top team, and I could not have asked for more. I kept following WorldSBK closely, and I’m confident the Panigale R can perfectly suit my riding style.

“We’ll just have to take one step at a time, but the potential is surely high. I know it won’t be easy to get back up to speed, but I have all the time to step on the bike, do laps and make sure I’m ready for the first test.”

Melandri will team up with Davies, who joined Ducati in 2014 and has had his contract extended by two years.

“I’m extremely happy to renew my professional relationship with Ducati for two more seasons,” Davies said.

“The continuity element is really important in our job, and so far we’ve made great strides and got progressively closer to our goal.

“Now we can fight for the win practically on every track, and I’m confident we can make further improvements.

“Moreover, to race for Ducati is something special: everything is done with heart and passion, you really feel part of a family and have a direct connection between the production and racing. It’s going to be exciting.”

Melandri’s arrival also means the end of Giugliano’s three-year tenure at the team.

Having missed much of 2015 due to injury, Giugliano is currently fourth in the standings but is 75 points adrift of Davies.

Source: Ducati signs Melandri, confirms Davies for 2017

BIPARTISAN CONGRESSIONAL LETTER AIMS TO PREVENT E15 RELATED ENGINE DAMAGE – Did your representative sign the letter?

BIPARTISAN CONGRESSIONAL LETTER AIMS TO PREVENT E15 RELATED ENGINE DAMAGE – Did your representative sign the letter?

On June 8, U.S. Reps. Bob Goodlatte (R-Va.), Peter Welch (D-Vt.), Bill Flores (R-Texas), Jim Costa (D-Calif.) and Steve Womack (R-Ark.) sent a letter to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to “…express concern about the lack of consumer awareness surrounding the inappropriate use of E15 gasoline and… how it [the EPA] plans to mitigate consumer misfuelings… .”

With your help, 45 representatives have agreed to support motorcyclists in their effort to ensure that safe fuels remain available and the risk of misfueling with E15 is reduced.

See if your representative signed the letter!

The bipartisan letter comes in response to the EPA’s Renewable Volume Obligations rule for 2014, 2015 and 2016. The EPA proposal would increase the amount of ethanol from all sources in the nation’s fuel supply to 17.4 billion gallons in 2016, up from 15.93 billion gallons in 2014.

Those increases come despite the EPA’s acknowledgement that the current market cannot absorb these higher ethanol production rates without substantially increasing the amount of ethanol in our nation’s gasoline supply. The practical effect of the EPA’s action is more unsafe E15 (15 percent ethanol by volume), less E10 and virtually no E0 for older and vintage machines.

As the American Motorcyclist Association has repeatedly warned, more E15 will inevitably lead to inadvertent misfueling, which can damage motorcycle and all-terrain-vehicle fuel systems and engines not designed for its use. Moreover, the use of E15 may void the manufacturer’s warranty.

With a high probability of inadvertent misfueling, the letter urges the EPA to “…act to raise consumer awareness of the consequences of misfueling with E15.” Currently, the effort to bring awareness is left up to the AMA and other consumer-oriented and industry groups.

The urgency of EPA action to address misfueling is supported by a recent study from the Outdoor Power Equipment Institute. The study indicates only 5 percent of consumers are aware that E15 is prohibited for use in certain engines and that 60 percent of consumers assume that any gas sold at a pump must be safe for all of their engines.

This letter will help protect the 22 million motorcycles and ATVs currently in use and the riders who depend on their safe operation.

Now more than ever, it is crucial that you and your riding friends become members of the AMA to help protect our riding freedoms. More members mean more clout against the opponents of motorcycling. That support will help fight for your rights – on the road, trail, racetrack, and in the halls of government. If you are a motorcycle rider, join the AMA at www.americanmotorcyclist.com/membership/join.

Source: AMA Federal Action Center

SUPERBIKES WITH SOUL: CLASSIC vs MODERN SUPERBIKE COMPARISON TEST

SUPERBIKES WITH SOUL: CLASSIC vs MODERN SUPERBIKE COMPARISON TEST

Three-time World Champion Freddie Spencer test six amazing superbike homologation specials and two modern counterparts.

As Freddie Spencer climbed to the top step of the 1982 Daytona Superbike podium, he knew he was done racing Superbikes. His first year in Grand Prix loomed before him, and he had already tasted Formula 1 perfection aboard the Honda FWS1000. ?He knew what a good racebike should feel like and the CB900F-based Superbike wasn’t it.

“It was a handful,” Freddie reflects. “In this corner, it would move around in about six different directions before you could turn it. In that corner, it would move in eight! It was never settled, never calm. I won Daytona on it in ’82 and told Honda I was done with Superbikes.”

At this point, historians are scratching their heads and wondering, “So how did he win Daytona Superbike in ’83, ’84 and ’85?

“Because in the fall of ’82, I tested the prototype 750 Interceptor at Daytona. I was almost three seconds a lap faster than on the old CB and that was after about six laps! I told Honda I wanted to race Daytona. By March, the bike was really good.”

Honda admits the 1983 750 Interceptor was the first production bike built with racing in mind, but Big Red wasn’t alone: Suzuki’s ’83 GS750 and Kawasaki’s ’83 GPz750 bristled with race-inspired bits, and suddenly, all of us on Katana 1000s and GPz1100s and XS1100s found our-selves on heavy, wobbly streetbikes. I know because I was 21 years old and even my modded Kat couldn’t turn and rev like the shiny red Interceptor my buddy Don Debusk bought. Read more…

 

 

Source: Superbikes With Soul: Classic vs. Modern Superbike Comparison Test

SUPPORT THE RPM (RECOGNIZING THE PROTECTION OF MOTORSPORTS) ACT OF 2016 – Defend your right to race!

SUPPORT THE RPM (RECOGNIZING THE PROTECTION OF MOTORSPORTS) ACT OF 2016

BREAKING: According to the EPA “The final Phase 2 Greenhouse Gas Emissions Standards and Fuel Efficiency Standards for Medium- and Heavy-Duty Engines and Vehicles will not contain clarifying language regarding modification for racing purposes.” For more information read “Removing Clarifying Language from the Proposed Phase 2 Medium- and Heavy-Duty Greenhouse Gas Standards

Members of both chambers of Congress have introduced versions of a bill that would prevent the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency from regulating the conversion of street motorcycles and other motor vehicles into competition-only racers. The EPA failed to provide proper notice of this regulation, including it in an unrelated heavy-duty-truck regulation. The proposed rule would hurt thousands of amateur and professional motorcycle racing enthusiasts and the millions of fans who enjoy motorcycle competition.

The bi-partisan Recognizing the Protection of Motorsports Act of 2016 (H.R. 4715 and S. 2659, RPM Act) would ensure that converting motor vehicles into competition-only vehicles remains legal. Street motorcycles are considered motor vehicles under the Clean Air Act.

The RPM Act was introduced in the House by U.S. Reps. Patrick McHenry (R-N.C.), Henry Cuellar(D-Texas), Richard Hudson (R-N.C.), Bill Posey (R-Fla.) and Lee Zeldin (R-N.Y.).

The Senate version was introduced by U.S. Sens. Richard Burr (R-N.C.), Shelley Moore Capito (R-W.Va.), Thom Tillis (R-N.C.) and Dean Heller (R-Nev.).

The act states that it was the clear intent of Congress when passing and amending the Clean Air Act that motor vehicles, including motorcycles, used solely for competition would be exempt from the Clean Air Act’s prohibitions against modifying emission control devices.

On March 15th, The House Committee on Science, Space, & Technology’s Oversight Subcommittee held a hearing on this issue. You can watch the hearing, as well as read the statements given by the Rep. McHenry, the Preident and CEO of SEMA, as well as the President of National Speed Sports News, Ralph Sheheen, here.

The American Motorcyclist Association supports the bills and their protections for amateur and professional racing enthusiasts.

Tell your senators and representatives that you support S. 2659 and H.R. 4715. Send a prewritten email by using the easy-to-use AMA Action Center.

The RPM Act now has 64 cosponsors in the House and 9 in the Senate, if your Representative or Senator is already a sponsor, you can thank them for their support as well.

The AMA is coordinating efforts with the Specialty Equipment Market Association and other racing sanctioning bodies in support of the RPM Act. SEMA represents vehicle aftermarket manufacturers, marketers and distributers.

Now more than ever, it is crucial that you and your riding friends become members of the AMA to help protect our riding freedoms. More members mean more clout against the opponents of motorcycling. That support will help fight for your rights – on the road, trail and racetrack and in the halls of government. If you are a motorcycle rider, join the AMA at americanmotorcyclist.com/membership/join.

Source: Send a Message

NEW DUCATI REDLINE EDITION AVAILABLE NOW!

NEW DUCATI REDLINE EDITION AVAILABLE NOW!

The new edition of Redline Magazine is out now, with tons of news for Ducati fans around the world!

The central theme of this edition is the company’s 90th anniversary and you’ll find a focus on the many milestones that make up Ducati’s glorious history, as well as a special feature on the Panigale 1299 S Anniversario, presented during World Ducati Week. Don’t miss the pages dedicated to the Multistrada 1200 Enduro and 959 Panigale, the exclusive interview with Casey Stoner, and the latest news from the colorful Land Of Joy! The new Redline Magazine also provides details of all the new Ducati apparel, designed to offer maximum comfort and safety in any riding condition, without compromising on style or design. Click image above or here to download your copy now!

Source: Ducati

AMERICAN MOTORCYCLIST ASSOCIATION TELLS U.S. EPA TO LOWER ETHANOL CONTENT IN FUEL

AMA TELLS U.S. EPA TO LOWER ETHANOL CONTENT IN FUEL

PICKERINGTON, Ohio — The American Motorcyclist Association told the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency that it should stop increasing the amount of required ethanol in the nation’s fuel supply and, instead, lower the Renewable Volume Obligations for 2017.

The comments submitted to the EPA were accompanied by the signatures of 18,162 motorcyclists, all-terrain-vehicle owners and others who are concerned that increased amounts of ethanol in their fuel could void warranties, damage engines and harm other components on their vehicles.

The EPA’s proposed Renewable Volume Obligations, part of the federal Renewable Fuel Standard, call for 18.8 billion gallons of biofuel for 2017, up from 18.11 billion gallons this year. The obligations for 2015 were 16.93 billion gallons.

“The current proposed volumes would greatly increase the risk of inadvertent misfueling for motorcyclists and ATV owners by forcing the widespread availability of higher-ethanol fuel blends that are unsafe for these vehicles, such as E15,” said Wayne Allard, AMA vice president of government relations. “And the EPA has proposed the increases, despite its acknowledgement that the market can’t absorb the higher ethanol production rates.”

The proposed percentage standards call for renewable fuel to compose 10.44 percent of the transportation fuel pool in 2017. The most widely used transportation fuel in the United States is E10, fuel containing 10 percent ethanol by volume.

To meet the proposed standards, the EPA is calling for increased use of E15 fuel in model year 2001 and newer vehicles and expanded use of E85 in flex-fuel vehicles. E15 fuel has 50 percent more ethanol than E10, and none of the estimated 22 million motorcycles and ATVs in use in the United States is approved to use E15 or higher ethanol blends. For engines and fuel systems not designed for E15, serious damage can occur.

“The AMA is fighting to ensure a safe fuel supply for motorcyclists, ATV riders and users of other small engines,” Allard said. “As the volume obligations continue to rise, even as fuel consumption declines or remains the same, the risk of inadvertent misfueling increases dramatically.

“The EPA has made it illegal for motorcyclists and ATV riders to use E15 fuel, yet shows little interest in the misfueling issue.”

The least the EPA could do is initiate a public information campaign on the dangers of misfueling, what fuel blend to select at the pump and what to do if a higher-ethanol blend gets into the vehicle tank.

Allard said that, because the Renewable Fuel Standard is broken, Congress needs to address it with a long-term fix. All concerned individuals are urged to visit the AMA Action Center and to find and contact their representatives about this issue.

Source: American Motorcyclist Association tells U.S. EPA to lower ethanol content in fuel – American Motorcyclist Association

DUCATI SAYS LORENZO KNOWS ITS BIKE IS COMPETITIVE

DUCATI SAYS LORENZO KNOWS ITS BIKE IS COMPETITIVE

Ducati boss Paolo Ciabatti insists that Jorge Lorenzo is fully aware that the lack of results from Andrea Dovizioso and Andrea Iannone are not a reflection of the competitiveness of its MotoGP bike.

Dovizioso is ninth in the standings, 111 points behind leader Marc Marquez, while Iannone is eighth, 107 points behind the Spaniard.

Up until now, between them they have managed four podiums (two each), a bounty that is far from the expectations generated during the pre-season.

In the winter, the Borgo Panigale company went from less to more. It couldn’t extract the best from the Desmosedici GP until the second test in Australia, but from then until the first race in Qatar, the bike continued to grow and giving the riders a better feeling.

However, Iannone’s fall at Losail, the fratricide in Argentina, and the crash between Pedrosa and Dovizioso in Austin were a big hit to the aspirations of the Italian manufacturer, which finally convinced the reigning world champion to join it from 2017.

“Jorge is a very fast and intelligent rider. He has seen the potential of our bike,” said Ciabatti when asked by Motorsport.com about the conversations it has have so far with the Spanish rider.

“Except for a few exceptions where we have suffered from a lack of grip, like in the two Spanish races, the Desmosedici has always worked well.

“Jorge is aware of the level of competitiveness of our bike and he has nothing to worry about because we are working on the 2017 bike with his riding style in mind.

“And we have to keep into account that Casey Stoner is helping us with that, and he knows him very well.”

Source: Ducati says Lorenzo knows its bike is competitive

SUMMER BBQ EVENT @ SUPERBIKE CORSE – SAT 7/23 @ 11:30am


PHOTOS POSTED OF SUMMER BBQ EVENT @ SUPERBIKE CORSE (7/23)bbq_0600a

JULY 23rd (Sat): Don’t forget to stop by after Cars & Coffee and/or your Ortega Hwy morning ride for Superbike Corse’s Summer BBQ Event starting @ 11:30am.  Complimentary Food and Drinks will be provided. While at the shop, check out the new ReeVu Helmets and inquire or sign up for future trackdays organized by Superbike Corse! See you Saturday for lunch!!!

Updated w/photos

20160723_122909 20160723_122822 20160723_122848 20160723_122837 20160723_122950 20160723_122831 20160723_122818 20160723_124734 20160723_124727

REEVU MOTORCYCLE HELMETS – THE WORLD’S FIRST REAR VIEW HELMET: NOW AVAILABLE @ SUPERBIKE CORSE!

REEVU HELMETS – THE WORLD’S FIRST REAR VIEW HELMET: NOW AVAILABLE @ SUPERBIKE CORSE!

Reevu motorcycle helmets prevent accidents with their rear view system – a new level of safety

 

The World’s first motorsport helmet with a built-in, FULLY ADJUSTABLE rear-view mirror system is being launched by North East England based Global brand leader in rear-view helmets, Reevu.

Motorbike helmets serve one purpose – to protect. Reevu have taken this concept further, producing the world’s first motorbike helmets with an integrated rear vision system that helps prevent accidents. A new age in motorcycle helmets has arrived.

The latest Reevu helmet has been developed over the last 30 months in response to market demand for a motorsport helmet with a fully adjustable optic part allowing the wearer to tailor the rear-view mirror system to their precise requirements. The internationally patented development of the Reevu helmet will see sales of the new helmet get underway shortly across North America, Europe and the Far East / Australasia.

The innovative and world-leading technology allows the wearer to view the road behind using a set of bulletproof, coated optics, that are now fully adjustable for a bespoke fit.

Reevu, which has its head office in Washington and manufacturing plants in Europe and Asia, was established in 1999, and is represented in most international markets through exclusive distributors.

The launch of this latest Reevu motorsport helmet is the culmination of ten years of European R&D, all of which has been privately funded.

Reevu products are a unique revolutionary invention in the helmet market. This displacement innovation is taking market share all around the world.  Superbike Corse is now a part of this global phenomena and is the official Reevu Helmet distributor in Orange County.  If you would like to purchase this extraordinary helmet email Drew Immiti at drew@sbkcorse.com  or contact Superbike Corse through their Facebook or Website pageYellow, red, black and white Reevu helmet

Source: Reevu motorbike helmets. Reevu – the world’s first rear view helmet

ITALIA FEST & SUPERBIKE CORSE’S 5-YEAR ANNIVERSARY EVENT (6/18) PHOTOS POSTED

ITALIA FEST & SUPERBIKE CORSE’S 5-YEAR ANNIVERSARY EVENT (6/18) PHOTOS POSTED

The photos taken at Superbike Corse’s annual Italia Fest and 5yr anniversary event are now posted.  Click on the examples below to be redirected to the event photos page.  Superbike Corse thanks all who attended this event with special recognition to GP Motorcycles (San Diego, CA), Newport Italian (Newport Beach, CA), and RentaDucati.com for providing the motorcycles on display.  Thanks to the vendors Pilot Leathers, Reevu Helmet, Peter Starr Productions (Movies/Books/Photos), Christian Motorcycle Association, Flex Fitness, Fratelli Colletti Sicilian Olive Oil, and Doffo Vineyard Wines.  Have a great summer and see you all soon!
20160617-_SRG067520160617-_SRG069920160617-_SRG067220160617-_SRG0691 20160617-_SRG0663 20160617-_SRG0654 20160617-_SRG0694 20160617-_SRG0658 20160618-SRG_2103

UPDATE: SUPERBIKE CORSE’S LAGUNA SECA TRACK DAY (5/19/16) PICS/VIDS POSTED!

UPDATE: SUPERBIKE CORSE’S LAGUNA SECA TRACK DAY (5/19/16) PICS/VIDS POSTED!

Superbike Corse’s inaugural Laguna Seca Raceway Trackday is now in the history books as having a great turnout with perfect May day weather!  The post-trackday dinner at Phil’s Fish Market located at Moss Landing just north of Monterey, CA is also in everone’s stomach, as the best seafood they’ve ever eaten!  Check out the photos posted in the ‘events photos‘ section of this website or click on the sample photos below to be redirected accordingly.

May-19-2016-Superbike Corse - After Lunch - Turn 1 and 2 - WSR_1722_May1916_by_ZW-CaliPhoto

May-19-2016-Superbike Corse - After Lunch - Corkscrew Top Scenic - ACS_1708_May1916_by_BR-CaliPhoto

Above Video GOPR3175: Taken Thursday, ‎May ‎19, ‎2016, ‏‎2:03:48 PM

DCIM249GOPRO

DCIM249GOPRO DCIM249GOPRO P1310674 P1310697 P1310696 P1310687P1310693